Assignments:Blackboard:All students must

Assignments:Blackboard:All students must have access to and be familiar with Blackboard. You are expected to confirm that the email address posted for you in the Blackboard class list is accurate. You are responsible for all content sent to the listed email address. ??.?.This syllabus, all assignments and other course information will be posted on Blackboard?you will be expected to be thoroughly familiar with information posted. All grades will be posted on Blackboard.Weekly Work:Each week, students are responsible for logging into Blackboard to access course content (lectures), weekly reading assignments and graded assignments. I will send a Course Announcement through Blackboard when material is available. All weekly assigned readings are available at the beginning of the term.Weekly, students should visit the Course Information tab in Blackboard to review the Syllabus and Course Schedule. Next, visit Assignments >Weekly Readings>Week X) to access the week?s assigned readings. Next, visit Course Documents to review the Lecture for the week. Finally, visit Assignments>Assignments Week X to view the week?s assignments. Please note that, in addition to the Lecture and your weekly readings, you have two graded assignments: a Student Blog post, Discussion Board post. A Syllabus Quiz is given during week one. Each is worth 5 points. Access to Student Blogs and the Discussion Board is through Blackboard.Please note that during Week TWO, you are required to visit the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA) on Campus and prior to the end of Week SIX, you are required to see either Spring Awakening at the University Theater or Clybourne Park at the Oregon Contemporary Theater. Admission is FREE for the JSMA and the University Theater performance or $10-15 at Oregon Contemporary Theater with your Student ID?s, but please review the hours at JSMA and the play dates so that you can complete weekly assignments on time. Information about JSMA can be found at http://jsma.uoregon.edu/, about University Theater at http://blogs.uoregon.edu/theatre/ and about the Oregon Contemporary Theater at www.octtheatre.org . If you are taking this course remotely (not from Eugene), please email me and I will help you find an alternative gallery/museum to visit and theater performance to view. ??.?.Graded Work:Syllabus Quiz (5 points): There will be a quiz on this syllabus during week one of class. Students may use your syllabus as you complete the quiz. The quiz is timed. Please make sure you have a good Internet connection and that you have read the syllabus carefully before beginning the quiz. Each student will receive one attempt at completing the quiz.Weekly Student Blog Post: There will be one short written activity per week that is due on Sunday by 11:59 PM (Pacific Standard time). Each weekly assignment (10 total) will respond to readings and course content for that week. Assignments will focus the exploration and critical analysis of class themes rather than picking a correct answer. Each weekly assignment is worth 5 points.Weekly Discussion Board Post: Each student is required to post to the Class Discussion Board once a week (10 total). Posts should be thoughtful and respond to reading and other course material for the week. Students are also required to engage with other students in the course by responding to other Discussion Board posts. Each weekly post (including responses to other student posts) is worth 5 points.Art Response Essay: Students will write a three page essay responding to an original work of art at a local site (attend a museum, watch a live theatre production, visit a historic home or an interesting piece of architecture) and form a personal perspective using the course content to support discussion. An exercise in preparing to write this essay and grading rubric will be provided on Blackboard under Assignments. The essay is worth 100 points of the final grade. ??.?.Final Project: (Adapted from Julie Voelker-Morris) Overview: The intent of the AAD 252 Art & Gender final project is to put into practice some of the course concepts we?ve addressed this term and to further explore issues related to art and gender. It is also an opportunity to present materials in a unique and thoughtful mannerbeyond the traditional term paper. Keep in mind that your project should be a kind of art form in itself; it is a means of expressing what you have learned in this course through both written and artistic communication. The various elements should work together in a cohesive way. This project may be completed individually or with a partner. Options for final projects are posted below. Begin by framing the project so that we understand what you want to learn and why it would be a culminating experience for the course, etc. Then, think about the best method and product to achieve those goals. This project should be a cumulative conclusion to this course, but that does not mean it cannot be fun! Choose something that is particularly meaningful to you; it will make it much more interesting to complete the project! Projects will be shared with your peers.Project Option 1: Create and Interpret an Art ExhibitPurpose: Exhibits can accomplish many things. They can educate and inform the viewer by illuminating an issue or idea, challenge assumptions, make connections, and offer new perspectives. Think back to your visit to JSMA ? the best exhibits help viewers make connections between social, cultural, political, economic, or religious issues that inform the viewing of the subject or objects. They put objects and/or issues into a specific context. Focus: Using a concept presented in class as your foundation (ie. marginalization, access, privilege, belonging, etc.), plan and develop a themed interpretive exhibit. Build the exhibit around this concept or a specific reading from that week. Or alternatively, you could choose to focus on an art form we have not focused on this term, and present this topic area with a gendered perspective. ??.?.Requirements: The theme of your exhibit should be developed VISUALLY (with IMAGES/ OBJECTS) and VERBALLY (through TEXT within the exhibit) to develop a cohesive whole that helps the viewer make connections. Text in an exhibit is generally detailed and/or highly informative. (Again, think back to your visit to the JSMA). You need to present a minimum of 15-20 objects/images within your exhibit. There are several ways to approach this. You could look at a particular type of imagery from a historical perspective and highlight any changes and/or developments and their significance. You could use contrast or comparison to illustrate key concepts. You could look at what was going on at a particular time in society and use this to put a particular art movement or style into the larger context of the time. IMPORTANT: Whatever you choose to focus on, gender should be the underlying issue that is addressed in the content of your exhibit.Presenting your Exhibit: 1) Set up a personal web page and host your exhibit there. 2) Create an HTML or PDF file that includes text and images. E-mail this document to instructor AND classmates. Remember this document must contain text and visuals. 3) Use your blackboard student blog as the site for sharing your exhibit.Curator?s Statement: In addition to the exhibit itself, you will hand in a two to three-page (double spaced & typed) curator?s statement of the exhibit that describes: a) the focus, b) the purpose, c) the anticipated audience, and d) your anticipated impact on audience.Provide references of where original images/sites/etc. may be found. You must reference/refer to a minimum of TWO course readings within the exhibit itself as well as within the statement. Please make certain to include a reference list, title, etc. as you would with any other paper.Project Option 2: Create an Art ObjectPurpose: Throughout the course, various forms of artistic expression are explored in terms of gender. Just as many artists explore issues related to gender in their artwork, this is an opportunity for you to create an art object that in some way explores gender. The art object could be a personal exploration of gender, or you could explore some specific issue related to gender. You could also create a work in a medium that is considered gendered and in some way challenge gender expectations through this medium (For example you could create a quilt but change the materials used or choose an image or motif to incorporate that challenges gender expectations). The possibilities for this option are wide and varied. Other examples could include but are not limited to writing a song, producing a short film, writing a short story, etc. Format & Focus: This is up to you and the type of medium with which you choose to work. You could build the work around a concept area from class or a specific reading. Or alternatively, you could choose to focus on an art form we have not focused on this term, and present your work with a gendered perspective. IMPORTANT: Whatever you choose to focus on, gender should be the underlying issue that is addressed in the content of your work. Requirements: ??.?.Ways that you might present your art object: Because of the varied nature of this project option, the ways in which you present your artwork are also varied (ie. visual art should be photographed; a short film should be presented as a video file; etc.). You will also need to present the work of art and post it, along with your artist?s statement, either on: 1) A personal web page 2) Your blackboard student blog For visual art, include an overall view of the artwork as well as one or two close-up details. If there is text included in the work of art, make sure you include what the text says if we will not be able to read it in a photograph.Artist?s Statement: Along with the work of art you must hand in a two to three page (double spaced, typed) artist?s statement explaining: a) the focus, b) the purpose, c) the work itself and how it relates to gender, d) your anticipated impact on an audience.If your artwork utilizes ANY existing imagery, sound or other material, provide references of where original images/sites/etc. may be found. You should refer to course content and a minimum of TWO readings that support/ explain your intention with the work of art. Please make certain to include a reference list, title, etc. as you would with any other paper.Project Option 3: Develop a CollectionPurpose: Many of us are collectors and can best study a topic by collecting examples of objects or ideas. If one of the concepts or themes of the course struck you as particularly interesting, you may want to collect objects, images, bibliographic notations, or web site addresses that relate to the theme. Examples may include: a) a collection of articles that discuss body modification, b) a list of artworks (with images) that deal with specific gendered poses, or c) an annotated list of web sites specifically highlighting gendered roles in cult film.Focus: There are several ways to approach this. You could look at a particular type of imagery in a time-specific context. You could build the work around a concept presented in class or a specific reading. Or alternatively, you could choose to focus on an art form we have not focused on this term, and present your work with a gendered perspective. ??.?.IMPORTANT: Whatever you choose to focus on, gender should be the underlying issue that is addressed in the content of your exhibit.Requirements: The collection should be developed VISUALLY (with IMAGES/OBJECTS) and VERBALLY (through TEXT) to develop a cohesive whole that helps the viewer/reader make connections. Text should be detailed and/or highly informative. You need to present a minimum of 15-20 items in this collection.Ways you might present your collection: Include an overall view of the collection as well as close-up detail images. Options for presenting the collection include: 1) Set up a personal web page and host your collection there. 2) Use your blackboard student blog as the site for sharing your collection. Collector?s Statement: Along with the work of collection, you will hand in a two to three page (double spaced, typed) collector?s statement explaining and describing the collection: a) as a whole, b) in relation to each part, c) how the items in the collection relate to one another, and d) how the collection relates to gender.Provide references of where original images/sites/etc. may be found. You should refer to course content and a minimum of TWO readings that support/explain your intention with the collection. Please make certain to include a reference list, title, etc. as you would with any other paper.Project Option 4: Submit an Original Project IdeaStudents often come up with interesting ideas for final projects that do not fall within the parameters outlined above. If you have an idea for a final project please e-mail it to me for consideration. Evaluation and overall requirements (a project with an accompanying 2-3 page statement) will be the same. Instructor approval is required.Submitting Final Projects and Written Statements: Final projects and written statements may be submitted utilizing one of these methods or another that is most appropriate to your presentation as well as accessible to most members of the course: 1. Via links or attachments or other posting in an email to the entire class. This can be sent to everyone from the Blackboard Communications Send Email tool (found under Course Tools). 2. Via posting ??.?.

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