media portfolio

1. Introduction – Chosen topic and why it is an Indigenous health issue – Background 2. The 4 media items – analysis – Full reference and working link at beginning of each item – Summary and analysis of key points in item – How fits into unit overall and topics discussed or covered – How media item contributes to the topic discussion or debate – Personal reflection on the issue 3. Conclusion 4. Reference list (on separate page) THIS IS THE ARTICLE TO BE ANALYSE: 4. https://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.cdu.edu.au/docview/1772628259?pq-origsite=summon Aboriginal woman puts violence against Indigenous women on international stage: Violence against Indigenous Australian women will this week be put under the international spotlight at a UN meeting in New York. Vicky Welgraven, an Aboriginal woman from South Australia, says that rates of violence against Indigenous women are horrific. She’ll join former Australian of the Year and anti-violence campaigner Rosie Batty at the conference. Kerin, Lindy. The World Today Sydney: Australian Broadcasting Corporation. (Mar 14, 2016) Abstract TranslateAbstract Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 35 times more likely to need hospital treatment because of domestic violence than other women and they are five times more likely to experience physical violence. ELEANOR HALL: Well violence against Indigenous Australian women will be put under the international spotlight at a UN meeting in New York tonight. Vicky Welgraven is an Aboriginal woman from South Australia and she’ll join Australian of the Year and anti-violence campaigner, Rosie Batty, in outlining what she says is a horrific problem. Lindy Kerin has our report. LINDY KERIN: The statistics are now well known but nonetheless startling. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are 35 times more likely to need hospital treatment because of domestic violence than other women and they are five times more likely to experience physical violence. VICKY WELGRAVEN: See those statistics, we need to do something and we feel that we need to do more work around that, because this is what our statistics are showing us. LINDY KERIN: Vicky Welgraven is an Adnyamathanha woman from the Northern Flinders Ranges of South Australia. VICKY WELGRAVEN: Adnya is rock and mathanha is people. LINDY KERIN: This week, she’s in New York for the UN’s Commission on the Status of Women conference. VICKY WELGRAVEN: Basically, what I want to do is get the message that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women back in Australia, the statistics at the moment are really high. We need more services that will be able to equip, like when our women do go domestic violence that we need to be able to provide them with a service where they can go with their kids to feel safe and all that sort of stuff. At the moment we don’t have services around. There is only certain ones that we have in our state and territories but I think there should be more emphasis on, you know, providing more services for our women out there. LINDY KERIN: She says she’s witnessed family and domestic violence in and around her community throughout her life. And she says it’s the number one issue she’s dealing with in her role with the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Alliance. VICKY WELGRAVEN: Growing up and seeing, you know, some people go through domestic violence and stuff, it made me feel that you know what? It’s something that I’ve always been passionate about and as an individual something that I want to see if I can make a difference or change out there and if I don’t then that’s okay but at least I can hold my head up high and say well at least I’ve tried and I’ve put it to the highest level of – to the UN level and you know at least I can say that I’ve tried. But to hear it and all that sort of stuff I think there should be more done about it. LINDY KERIN: The UN conference in New York will bring together women from around the world to discuss violence, equal rights and wage equality. Vicky Welgraven says she’s particularly keen to hear from first nations women from Canada who experience similar rates of violence as Indigenous Australian women. VICKY WELGRAVEN: And look at some of the issues that they’re dealing with and look at maybe projects or programs that they’ve gone about implementing, or putting forward or suggesting and stuff like that so that’s something we might be able to adopt back here in Australia, for our women. And I reckon that’s what it’s all about, going over there, sharing ideas, looking at what your country has done and looking at what they’ve done as well and then looking at a way where you can take that information on board and do something with it. And I think that’s the most powerful thing to do because you’re hearing it from different perspectives from different countries how they dealt with it. It will be a real eye opener to see how they’ve gone about- they might have changed something in their country and that’s the sort of things that I’d like to go over and hear about. ELEANOR HALL: That’s Vicky Welgraven, one of the Directors of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Alliance speaking to Lindy Kerin about her trip. Word count: 687 Copyright Australian Broadcasting Corporation Mar 14, 2016

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